EPA Asbestos Review May Trigger Probe of Chlorine Industry

Chlorine manufacturers, which currently are the largest U.S. importers of asbestos, could have their use of the mineral reviewed soon if the Environmental Protection Agency selects asbestos as one of the first 10 substances it will analyze under the amended chemicals law.

Chlorine and caustic soda are manufactured by the chlor-alkali industry, which uses asbestos for one of three processes that companies can use to produce both chemicals. The U.S. Geological Survey has listed the chlor-alkali industry as the primary importer of asbestos in each annual mineral commodity summary the service has published since 2013. The industry’s use accounted for 90 percent of the 358 tons of asbestos imported into the country in 2015, the geologic survey said in its 2016 summary.

The chlor-alkali industry’s use of asbestos should be evaluated by the EPA as part of an assessment of the risks posed by the mineral, Linda Reinstein, president of the nonprofit advocacy group Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO), told Bloomberg BNA Sept. 9 [2016].

[Article continues at original source]

Source: EPA Asbestos Review May Trigger Probe of Chlorine Industry


 Mesothelioma, Asbestos, and Legal Compensation: Basic Facts

Asbestos-Mesothelioma Case Evaluation Form
Free.  Confidential.  No Obligation.

Mesothelioma deaths alert US to continuing asbestos exposure

A paper from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (Niosh) reveals that the latest data for deaths linked to mesothelioma show increases between 1999 and 2009. The trend was for both sexes and all ethnic groups, and the authors remark that the “continuing deaths of those aged less than 55 suggests continuing exposure to asbestos fibres”.

Continuing deaths from malignant mesothelioma, the lung disease associated with asbestos fibres, have alerted the US health authorities of the need for continuing efforts to prevent exposure…..

The US Geological Survey produced a commodity summary in January 2016, which says that the chloralkali industry accounted for 90% of US consumption of 360 tons in 2015. Its use by the industry is for diaphragms which separate anode and cathode products in chloralkali electrolytic cells. The remainder is used in coatings and compounds, plastics and roofing products.
[Read full article at original source]

Source: Mesothelioma deaths alert US to continuing asbestos exposure


 Mesothelioma, Asbestos, and Legal Compensation: Basic Facts

Asbestos-Mesothelioma Case Evaluation Form
Free.  Confidential.  No Obligation.

Asbestos ban to be announced by federal government next week

The federal government plans to announce a comprehensive ban on asbestos in Canada next week, CBC News has learned.

The country currently allows imports of construction products and automotive parts that contain the toxic fibre, even though Canada no longer exports the material.

Asbestos is known to cause deadly cancers and lung diseases, and has already been banned in Europe, Australia and Japan. The World Health Organization recommends replacing asbestos with safer substitutes.

Canadian labour and public health groups have been calling for a comprehensive ban for years.

About 2,000 Canadians die of asbestos-related diseases every year — many of those deaths have been linked to asbestos exposure in the workplace.

[Article continues at original source]

Source: Asbestos ban to be announced by federal government next week


 Mesothelioma, Asbestos, and Legal Compensation: Basic Facts

Asbestos-Mesothelioma Case Evaluation Form
Free.  Confidential.  No Obligation.

Canada should stop importing deadly asbestos, labour group says

The Canadian Labour Congress is calling for a ban on asbestos.

Exposure to asbestos — a fibrous mineral used in building and construction — is the leading cause of workplace-related death in Canada.

Canada stopped exporting asbestos in 2011, and its last asbestos mine closed in 2012. But Canada still imports asbestos for use in construction products and automotive parts.

According to the Canadian Labour Congress, the value of the imports has increased from $4.7 million in 2011 to $8.2 million in 2015.

Hassan Yussuff, president of the Canadian Labour Congress, told CBC’s The Early Edition the government needs to step up and ban the import of asbestos.

“We only stopped exporting it because the mine went bankrupt, not because this is good public policy.  We knew the evidence long before that asbestos is a carcinogen.”

[Article continues at original source]

Source: Canada should stop importing deadly asbestos, labour group says


 Mesothelioma, Asbestos, and Legal Compensation: Basic Facts

Asbestos-Mesothelioma Case Evaluation Form
Free.  Confidential.  No Obligation.

Asbestos and product defence science

In 2015, the Collegium Ramazzini, an independent, international academy of experts in occupational and environmental health, released three statements on asbestos.1–3 The documents are focused on the only form of asbestos remaining in use, i.e. chrysotile (white asbestos). The Collegium is concerned by the persisting use of chrysotile in many countries taking place in spite of the evidence of its carcinogenicity and the calls for a ban by the World Health Organization, the International Labour Organization and the Collegium itself as well as other institutions over the past decades.

Currently, over half of the world’s population is extracting and/or using 2 million tons of asbestos annually, mostly in low- and middle-income countries. Asia has become the largest asbestos consumer in the world and Russia, Kazakhstan and Brazil have become the largest asbestos exporters. As late as 2015, the major producers and users of asbestos opposed the inclusion of chrysotile among substances covered by the Rotterdam Convention on the Prior Informed Consent Procedure for Certain Hazardous Chemicals and Pesticides in International Trade….

The Collegium notes that the reluctance to stop using asbestos is a consequence of ‘the corrupting influence of pro-chrysotile lobbies employing product defence science’. This term encompasses research activities whose goals are not scientific knowledge but to influence policy decisions on the use of an industrial product….

[Article continues at original source]

Source: Asbestos and product defence science

 


 Mesothelioma, Asbestos, and Legal Compensation: Basic Facts

Asbestos-Mesothelioma Case Evaluation Form
Free.  Confidential.  No Obligation.

Ford spent $40 million to reshape asbestos science

The lawyer, Darrell Grams, explained that Ford had been losing lawsuits filed by former auto mechanics alleging asbestos in brakes had given them mesothelioma, an aggressive cancer virtually always tied to asbestos exposure. Grams asked Paustenbach, then a vice president with the consulting firm Exponent, if he had any interest in studying the disease’s possible association with brake work. A meeting cemented the deal.

Paustenbach, a prolific author of scientific papers who’d worked with Grams on Dow Corning’s defense against silicone breast-implant illness claims, had barely looked at asbestos to that point. “I really started to get serious about studying asbestos after I met Mr. Grams, that’s for sure,” Paustenbach testified in a sworn deposition in June 2015. Before that, he said, the topic “wasn’t that interesting to me.”

Thus began a relationship that, according to recent depositions, has enriched Exponent by $18.2 million and brought another $21 million to Cardno ChemRisk, a similar firm Paustenbach founded in 1985, left and restarted in 2003. All told, testimony shows, Ford has spent nearly $40 million funding journal articles and expert testimony concluding there is no evidence brake mechanics are at increased risk of developing mesothelioma. This finding, repeated countless times in courtrooms and law offices over the past 15 years, is an attempt at scientific misdirection aimed at extricating Ford from lawsuits, critics say.

“They’ve published a lot, but they’ve really produced no new science,” said John Dement, a professor in Duke University’s Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine and an asbestos researcher for more than four decades. “Fifteen years ago, I thought the issue of asbestos risk assessment was pretty much defined. All they’ve accomplished is to try to generate doubt where, really, little doubt existed.”

[Article continues at original source]

Source: Center for Public Integrity


 Mesothelioma, Asbestos, and Legal Compensation: Basic Facts

Asbestos-Mesothelioma Case Evaluation Form
Free.  Confidential.  No Obligation.

Company Sanctioned for Not Preserving Asbestos Documents

A company that made asbestos products in the 1980s should have anticipated it would be sued, and therefore the destruction of dozens of boxes of related documents in the 1990s was spoliation requiring sanction, a Manhattan state judge has ruled.

Justice Peter Moulton rejected claims by J-M Manufacturing Company, one of the defendants in Warren v. Amchem Products, 190281/2014, that there had to be notice of a specific claim or pending litigation to trigger a requirement to preserve documents through a “litigation hold.”

“Every corporation which reasonably anticipates litigation must preserve relevant evidence,” Moulton said in a Nov. 9 opinion.

Even when litigation doesn’t start until 25 years after the products at issue were discontinued, he said “it is neither unfair nor overly burdensome for a company to place a litigation hold for a time period commensurate with the nature and risks of the product.”

He added: “Were this otherwise, companies with knowledge of the dangers of asbestos could intentionally destroy relevant evidence, while simultaneously knowing that due to the long latency period of asbestos-related diseases, they would not be sued until decades later.”

[Article continues at original source]

Source: Company Sanctioned for Not Preserving Asbestos Documents

 


 Mesothelioma, Asbestos, and Legal Compensation: Basic Facts

Asbestos-Mesothelioma Case Evaluation Form
Free.  Confidential.  No Obligation.

America’s ‘Third Wave’ Of Asbestos Disease Upends Lives

Everything seemed to be going smoothly for 39-year-old Kris Penny, who pulled fiber-optic cables for a living. Then he got a cancer called mesothelioma that’s almost always tied to asbestos exposure.

Until the morning of Sept. 25, 2014, life was treating Kris Penny well. His flooring company had just secured its first big contract.

But that morning, Penny, of Clermont, Fla., was feeling lethargic. He pulled into a McDonald’s for a cup of orange juice. Seconds after he drank it he doubled over in pain. “It felt like someone stabbed me in the stomach with a machete,” he said. A co-worker drove him to the emergency room.

When he awoke in the hospital, his wife, Lori McNamara, was beside him, crying. “I go, ‘What’s the matter? I’m still here,’ ” Penny said. The surgeon who’d opened up his abdomen had found it full of cancer — type to be determined. The doctor “pretty much told me to get my affairs in order, right there on the spot.”

The pathology results came in four days later. Penny learned that he had peritoneal mesothelioma — a rare cancer of the lining of the abdomen almost always tied to asbestos exposure. He concluded, after consulting with a lawyer, that he’d inhaled microscopic asbestos fibers about a decade earlier while installing fiber-optic cable underground. He sued telecommunications giant AT&T.

[Article continues at original source]

Source: America’s ‘Third Wave’ Of Asbestos Disease Upends Lives

 


 Mesothelioma, Asbestos, and Legal Compensation: Basic Facts

Asbestos-Mesothelioma Case Evaluation Form
Free.  Confidential.  No Obligation.

The Use Of Beauty Or Cosmetic Products That Had Asbestos-Contaminated Talc May Be The Cause Of That Mysterious, Non-traditional Mesothelioma Case

A couple of weeks ago we posted this article, “Mesothelioma And Cancers Caused By Asbestos-Contaminated Talc In Body Powder Products And Cosmetics: New Scientific Study Provides Evidence Of Asbestos Fibers In Talc”, which explored the asbestos-talc mesothelioma cancer situation.

Given the facts set forth in the underlying news report by investigative reporter Andrew Schneider, “Study: Cosmetic talc products carry asbestos peril”, one would think that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) would be taking action.

However, despite medical studies and lawsuits which point to cancers such as mesothelioma from exposure to asbestos-contaminated talc, the FDA maintains — as it has for many years in the past — that it lacks both resources and regulatory authority to protect consumers.

From a second investigative news report by Andrew Schneider, “FDA: Weak laws, sparse resources handcuff angency”, we get these revelations:

Many in public health look with envy at how other governments regulate products containing asbestos-tainted talc.

For example, in April 2009, South Korea’s Food and Drug Administration responded almost instantly after testing showed that hundreds of pharmaceutical and cosmetic products were contaminated with dangerous talc.

Immediately, tens of thousands of individual items _ of more than 1,100 different products –were ordered from store shelves and banned from future sale. They included finished products that were imported from China or made in South Korea from raw Chinese talc. The South Korean government said the imported talc had “dangerously high, completely unacceptable, levels of asbestos.”

As word of the South Korean action spread to the U.S public health community, FDA was asked whether it was sure that talc used here was asbestos free.

The agency repeated its talc mantra that it “relies on mine operators, importers and cosmetic and consumer product makers to ensure the safety of what they sell.”

And later from that same news report we see what this industry self-regulation is getting us, or not, in terms of protection from exposure to asbestos-contaminated talc:

In its examination of the relationship between asbestos and talc in 360 commercial sized and smaller U.S. talc deposits, the USGS reported that “a number of U.S. talc deposits of commercial size . . . . consistently contain talc intergrown with (asbestos) … such as tremolite and (or) anthophyllite,” and that “the amounts differ from none detected to trace to significant amounts of asbestos.”

But many safety experts are more concerned about the enormous volumes of often-cheaper foreign talc being used in the United States.

Import Genius, a commercial operation which tracks shipping activity of millions of products around the world, provided data that showed that in the last 18 months more than 1,400 shipments of talc or talc products were sent into the U.S. from 34 countries.

If someone diagnosed with malignant mesothelioma has no known exposure to the traditional asbestos-containing products such as thermal insulation and fire-proofing materials, investigators are now looking into the possibility that it was their use of beauty or cosmetic products that had asbestos-contaminated talc which may have been the cause of the mesothelioma.


 Mesothelioma, Asbestos, and Legal Compensation: Basic Facts

Asbestos-Mesothelioma Case Evaluation Form
Free.  Confidential.  No Obligation.

“No Safe Use”: A Tremendous Piece Of Interactive Journalism About The Terrible Asbestos-Mesothelioma Problem

I highly recommend that anyone with an interest in learning more about asbestos and asbestos-related diseases — the tragic asbestos cancer mesothelioma in particular — take some time to visit this site: “No Safe Use” (Copyright 2014 The Globe and Mail Inc. All Rights).

It starts with a haunting picture of John Nolan, age 67, blinking his eyes, and this interactive site allows you the option of listening to Mr. Nolan tell the story of his battle with mesothelioma, a cancer caused by exposure to asbestos.

Thereafter, you will find this seven-part journalistic report about the current asbestos problem in Canada with each part presenting some additional powerful photographs related to this terrible situation.

  • Part 1:   The Invisible Epidemic (which tell us more about the above-mentioned John Nolan)
  • Part 2:   Exposure Is Still Widespread
  • Part 3:   The Boom Years
  • Part 4:   Six Months To Live
  • Part 5:   Officially Safe In Canada
  • Part 6:   What Can Be Done
  • Part 7:   “Stuck In This Body”

From this tremendous piece of work, we leave you with a child’s note:

asbestos-note-by-child


 Mesothelioma, Asbestos, and Legal Compensation: Basic Facts

Asbestos-Mesothelioma Case Evaluation Form
Free.  Confidential.  No Obligation.

Law Offices of Thomas J. Lamb, P.A.
1908 Eastwood Road, Suite 225
Wilmington, NC 28403
Tel: (800) 426-9535
Email@LambLawOffice.com
Disclaimer and Copyright